DVD Review: Braquo – The Complete Season Three

Following hot on the heels of Barry Forshaw’s recently published indispensable overview Euro Noir, Arrow Films have unleashed a show several shades darker than the Scandi-crime series we’ve come to know, enjoy, and love in recent years.

Frequently compared to The Wire, Braquo is a hard hitting gritty police drama created by former officer turned screenwriter and director, Olivier Marchal (36 Quai des Orfèvres). The title is a French slang term for heist. A uniquely French take on the genre, this treacle thick uncompromising series is loaded with frenetic and electric twists from the opening frames right up until the closing moments of the final episode.

For two years fans have been eagerly awaiting the next instalment in the misadventures of anti-hero Eddy Caplan (Jean-Hugues Anglade). Plunged head-first into an ever widening spiral of deceit, destruction and corruption after a superior officer is accused of brutally assaulting a suspect during an interrogation. Facing loss of hard earned status and probable imprisonment this long standing member of the force takes his own life. Promoted to the head of the team, Caplan’s immediate priority is to clear his former boss’ name. An attempt to snatch the suspect from a hospital goes wrong with devastating consequences…

From the second season onwards the writing team was bolstered with the addition of Abdel Raouf Dafri (Mesrine, A Prophet). Harder edged than the première series, the adrenaline fuelled sophomore outing for Caplan and his crew ramped up the tension with increased action and intense violence alongside finely tuned characterisations. Pushing the envelope, series two offered up a pyrrhic tale of revenge and redemption that ended with an unexpected nerve shattering cliffhanger which left fans waiting two years to see how the team would deal with the consequences.

Successful in their quest to rejoin the elite unit, celebrations are cut short when Theo (Nicolas Duvauchelle) is caught in an explosion. With their friend and colleague rushed to hospital suffering from 80 % burns, Caplan and the crew are determined to avenge this atrocity. Cautioned by their boss against administering swift, and illegal, punishment the emotionally shattered team regroups to find ways of ensnaring the guilty party.

Returning to active duty, the unit investigates a human trafficking operation. Caught in the crossfire of a Mafia war that threatens to douse Paris in human blood, the team is plagued by bouts of infighting and must be constantly vigilant against double-crossing by members of their own department. Torn apart by grief and fury, Caplan and his crew continue their walk along the blurred line separating law from illegality. Refusing to let due process stand in the way of punishing wrongdoers this band of maverick cops is prepared to go to any lengths necessary in order to deliver retribution.

Shot through with a breathtaking barrage of dynamic action, murky characters who are never quite what they seem, and a constant stream of cigarette smoke, the series packs in layer upon layer of labyrinthine sub-plots. An addictive show that gets under the viewer’s skin and doesn’t shake free until the final credits have rolled. Over eight spellbinding hours a dark and murky tale unfolds at a breakneck speed involving the Eastern European Mafia, a former police officer turned kidnapper, and a woman hell-bent on seeking revenge.

Scripts from the writer of Mesrine and A Prophet have remodelled the show and given it a distinct identity unlike anything else on TV. Suspense filled and littered with twists which will leave the viewer feeling punch drunk. A mesmerizing glimpse into Paris’ darker crevices, Braquo is a worthy companion to the series currently being produced by our Scandinavian cousins.

Braquo – The Complete Series Three can be ordered from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braquo-Series-DVD-Jean-Hugues-Anglade/dp/B00KIM2SL4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1405946618&sr=8-2&keywords=braquo

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braquo-Series-Blu-ray-Jean-Hugues-Anglade/dp/B00KIM2TGS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1405946827&sr=8-2&keywords=braquo+blu

Braquo – Trilogy can be ordered from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braquo-Trilogy-DVD-Jean-Hugues-Anglade/dp/B00KIM2SKA/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1405946865&sr=8-2&keywords=braquo+trilogy

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Braquo-Trilogy-Blu-ray-Jean-Hugues-Anglade/dp/B00KIM2RJM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405946865&sr=8-1&keywords=braquo+trilogy

Euro Noir by Barry Forshaw is available from Amazon and all major booksellers:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Euro-Noir-Essential-European-Essentials/dp/1843442450/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405947305&sr=8-1&keywords=euro+noir

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Book Review: Euro Noir by Barry Forshaw

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One of the UK’s foremost experts on crime fiction, Barry Forshaw’s knowledge of the genre is without equal. In addition to editing Crime Time and Nordic Noir magazines, he is the author of several notable books including Death in a Cold Climate: A Guide to Scandinavian Crime Fiction and British Crime Film. Regularly called upon to appear in documentaries, it was whilst working on Italian Noir for BBC Four he was struck with inspiration and came up with the idea for what eventually became Euro Noir.

A companion to last year’s Nordic Noir (also published by Pocket Essentials), this latest volume has a far broader remit. Endeavouring to survey as many contemporary authors working in the field across the continent as possible, Barry Forshaw proves that the distinction between fan and media professional is an arbitrary one. Written with an infectious enthusiasm and drawing from many years devouring the cream of what our cousins from the mainland have to offer, the author presents a near definitive guide to Europe’s take on the genre.

Long term readers of Barry Forshaw’s work will know that his hallmark is the ability to appeal to newcomers seeking a thorough overview before making their own tentative steps into the nearest book shop, public library, or DVD store and yet still offering something that will force long term enthusiasts to rethink any assumptions they may have about an author, book, film, or movement. Offering a refreshing new take on the genre and its attendant criticism, the author’s trademark thorough research is taken into an entirely different realm by the addition of interview extracts with authors, translators and editors. Personal anecdotes of meeting writers and publishing staff at festivals or institutes lift this text so that it never becomes a dry analysis. An exuberant critical celebration, subtitled The Pocket Essential Guide to European Crime Fiction, Film &TV the book covers an immense number of titles and is written so that even those who have seen a specific film or read a particular book several times will want to go back and experience the story all over again to see how whatever nugget of information the author has offered changes the viewing or reading dynamic. A key plot or character moment may be totally transformed after reading what the writer wanted to convey or perhaps a cultural cue explained by Barry Forshaw might add layers of rich texture to a scene.

A justly deserved reputation for cogent arguments and an inclusive approach to the material being scrutinized was validated when the book was selected as a university set text whilst still in the proof stages. An essential guide not only to crime fiction but also a celebration of European popular culture. The overview has a slight bias towards the west not out of any personal preference but because of the availability of translated editions. Euro Noir is encyclopedic is scope and is written to be accessible, titles cited can be ordered from any major retailer.

Traversing the continent’s rich contribution to the genre of crime fiction Barry Forshaw doesn’t discriminate, authors less known to UK readers and more famous names are given an equal amount of coverage and analysis. From Georges Simenon through to Jakob Arjouni and Marek Krajewski, the figures vital to the foundation and expansion of European noir are profiled and their most representative works given the accord they deserve.

Alongside the consideration of the literary scene is a fully comprehensive overview of essential films and TV series that includes modern cult classics Braquo, Mesrine, Salamander, and Spiral but also covers older works including Les diaboliques, and Lucky Luciano.

Crime fiction is an ever expanding genre. In the year since Nordic Noir was published fans have been treated to a number of new authors along with a succession of high quality series brought to us courtesy of BBC 4, More 4, and Arrow Video. The author revisits Scandinavia’s contribution in a chapter that brings readers bang-up-to-date with what is happening in the Nordic territories.

Entertaining, illuminating, and indispensable. This is the ultimate road map for anybody interested in European crime books, film, and TV.

Euro Noir is available from Amazon and all other booksellers

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Euro-Noir-Essential-European-Essentials/dp/1843442450/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401557269&sr=8-1&keywords=barry+forshaw+euro+noir

DVD Review: Inspector De Luca

Characterized by gritty realism, existential struggles, institutional corruption, political instability, salacious segments and heroes frequently crushed by overwhelming opposition or vanquished by the dark finger of fate, Mediterranean Noir may from a UK perspective be considered a relatively new genre. Distinct in tone and worldview, like its Nordic counterpart, the movement places society under a microscope and critiques its failings. Comprehensively surveyed in Barry Forshaw’s forthcoming book Euro Noir, British and Irish audiences are already familiar with the genre thanks to BBC Four’s screening of the TV version of Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano novels. In literary terms, the authors Leonardo Sciascia and Jean-Claude Izzo have an enlarging English language readership. The vast panoply of authors and TV series currently gaining recognition by a new found fanbase is enlarged thanks to Arrow Films release of Inspector De Luca a series adapted from a trilogy by one of Italy’s best known contemporary crime writers, Carlo Lucarelli.

In the introduction to the Inspector De Luca novels, Lucarelli recounts an incident from his time as a doctoral student that inspired him to write the books and forsake his academic pursuits. Conducting background research for a thesis, he interviewed a former police officer with forty years active service who began his career in 1941 working for the fascist political police. Initially employed to monitor the activity of anti fascist groups before arrest, the political elite were so paranoid they subsequently engaged the services of this officer to conduct surveillance on pro fascist groups due to fears that they may be plotting to overthrow Benito Mussolini. Having conducted his duties throughout the early stages of the war without a blemish on his record he transferred into the partisan police immediately following the allies liberation of the country and served in that force for the remainder of the conflict. Following the cessation of hostilities fresh elections were held in Italy to form a new government, in this new regime the officer was tasked with monitoring and arresting his former colleagues because they were now regarded as dangerous subversives.

Coupling his personal fascination with the latter stages of Italy’s fascist regime and the testimony given during the interview with this former officer, Lucarelli considered how an individual could be so wedded to the concept of policing he would carry out instructions without question irrespective of the political implications or any sense of discontinuity at having to arrest individuals (sometimes former colleagues) for engaging in activities which were previously lawful. Spurred on by the fertile territory he had inadvertently stumbled upon Lucarelli abandoned his thesis and wrote the the Inspector De Luca trilogy; Carte Blanche, The Damned Season and Via delle Oche.

Produced in 2008, the TV adaptation adds a prologue episode set in 1938 to introduce De Luca, his point of view, working methods, relationship to superior officers and demonstrate how ordinary citizens were effected by the ever present struggle between fascism and the leftist groups who sought to topple the regime. Across ten years, in four episodes, De Luca’s pursuit of truth and justice across Bologna and the Adriatic coast frequently places him in trouble with whoever happens to be ruling at that moment. Steadfastly refusing to bend to suit the will of those seeking to quell an investigation, he dogmatically pursues a case despite incidents when it might be more prudent to take a less direct approach or to withdraw. First and foremost a police officer, De Luca is not a political realist or an apologist for any cause, for him the law is all that matters and he has a sworn duty to uphold it no matter what the personal cost may be.

The addition of an original introductory episode to complement the three adapted from Lucarelli’s novels creates a balance in terms of the series’ structure. Translating the novelist’s work to screen with due respect for the source material, the creative team have masterfully brought to life a well written trilogy with such insight and reverence it is impossible to detect a stylistic shift in the “new” prelude. The first two episodes are set during Mussolini’s reign and the subsequent instalments take place in a period when recriminations sat alongside reconstruction. Throughout one of the must tumultuous periods in modern European history the geographical, economic, social, and political turmoil is integral to communicating the series’ fictional milieux. The core theme of justice needing to be maintained in difficult times ensures that despite being a period drama, the series’ central message resonates.

In the newly written opener, An Unauthorized Investigation, the body of a sex worker is found washed up on the beach close to Mussolini’s summer home. Fearful of the consequences should the leader’s holiday be disturbed, the authorities demand that the case be solved swiftly. De Luca’s methods clash with his superiors when he starts investigating some of Mussolini’s acquaintances.

The second episode, based on the first book, Carte Blance, sees De Luca fall under the watchful eye of the fascist elite when he is placed in charge of trying to apprehend the murderer of a wealthy bachelor. At this stage in the war the Italian government was co-operating with Nazis and the palpable paranoia felt throughout this edition is accentuated as it becomes apparent that allied forces may storm the area at at any moment.

A dramatic change in tone throughout The Damned Season and its follow-up Via Della Oche demonstrates De Luca’s descent from trusted public official to despised collaborationist who must pose as a partisan. Unable to stand down from his duty, De Luca’s stubborn refusal to bend with the wind and seek an alternate lifestyle is no longer a virtue.

A turbulent era is brought to life with brio in a series blessed with intricately researched historical detail, sympathetic cinematography, and scripts that elevate the admittedly excellent source material to the level of near greatness. Recommended.

Inspector De Luca can be ordered from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Inspector-Luca-DVD-Alessandro-Preziosi/dp/B00IYMZIJY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397463000&sr=8-1&keywords=inspector+de+luca

Euro Noir by Barry Forshaw is available from Amazon and all major book retailers:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Euro-Noir-Essential-European-Essentials/dp/1843442450/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1397463121&sr=8-1&keywords=euro+noir