Film Review: The Balcony

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 Winner of the Silver Crane Award for best Lithuanian short film, The Balcony is a bitter-sweet tale of young friendship and dysfunctional families. A rose-tinted recreation of 1980s Lithuania. The era is seen through the eyes of two children and the director appears to be yearning for a simpler era. Those in the west seeing The Balcony for the first time may be surprised that the director has deliberately chosen to present a version of the Soviet era which runs counter to the more familiar narratives filled with oppression and poverty.

Director Giedrė Beinoriūtė’s recreation of the 1980s is filled with values that she feels have been lost in the years since independence. Directing films and documentaries since 1997,  Soviet rule and the consequences of its dismantling is a recurrent theme in her work.  Beinoriūtė’s 2008 film The Balcony is an unashamedly sentimental celebration of innocence.

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The film is set in a nondescript housing estate in an unspecified part of Lithuania. Rolanas’ parents have recently divorced and he has had to leave his hometown and move to a new district. Settling in he soon becomes friends with the young girl living in the neighbouring flat. Two shy and insecure children find that they have much in common.

The Balcony offers a glimpse of childhood under Soviet rule that may shatter many preconceptions. It is an effective dramatisation of children coming to terms with the breakup of their families.

The film is available to watch exclusively at Baltic View.

If you want to see The Balcony send an email to hello@balticview.online to register your interest.

Follow @baltic_view on Twitter.

A Facebook page has the latest information on screenings.

Film Review: The Green Musketeers

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You Gotta Fight for the Right to Garden: How an environmentalist movement planted a seed which grew into Lithuanian independence.

As the Soviet Union started to crumble Mikhail Gorbachev introduced a number of reforms intended to strengthen the nation’s infrastructure. He may have ended the Cold War but the last General Secretary of the Soviet Union inadvertently brought about the downfall of Communism in Europe.

Under Soviet rule since 1944, the Communist Party of Lithuania governed with an iron fist. The implementation of Perestroika was meant to reform Soviet Communist parties but it led to citizens experiencing greater freedoms for the first time since the Iron Curtain fell across Europe.

In Lithuania, a group of young idealists enraged by plans to drill for oil in the Baltic Sea organised a large-scale protest. This band of ecologically conscious Lithuanians established a community “Atgaja” and defined the zeitgeist for a nation heading towards independence.

Swedish director Jonas Ohman’s documentary shines a light on a moment in history largely unknown outside Lithuania. Interviewing surviving members of the community and using archive footage he demonstrates how a single idea can overthrow a tyranny. Focusing on the community’s charismatic leader Saulius Gricius, the film explores the community’s considerable legacy.

The Green Musketeers has an undeniable environmentalist message but it also drives home the importance of standing up to oppression and injustice no matter how high the personal cost may be.

The film is available to watch exclusively on Baltic View.

If you want to see The Green Musketeers send an email to hello@balticview.online to register your interest.

Follow @baltic_view on Twitter.

A Facebook page has the latest information on screenings.