Blu-ray Review: The Maggie

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Inspired by Neil Munro’s Para Handy stories, The Maggie is a lesser known Ealing comedy that has the distinction of being the one of only two comedic films produced by Ealing Studios to be set in Scotland.

American born Director Alexander Mackendrick remains a towering figure in the history of Scottish cinema. Making his début with Whisky Galore, he would go on to direct a succession of Ealing comedies including The Man in the White Suit and The Ladykillers. After the sale of Ealing Studios he moved to America and directed the classic film noir Sweet Smell of Success.

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Nominated for three BAFTA awards, The Maggie focuses on the misadventures of a crew aboard a decrepit puffer boat as they transport a wealthy American’s possessions to his holiday home. Released five years after Whisky Galore, the film offers a more satirical strain of Scottish humour that provides a commentary on post-war relations between Scotland, America, and England.

Overshadowed by the legacy of his other work for Ealing Studios, The Maggie is an exquisite comedy that has drifted into relative obscurity. A probable influence on William Forsyth’s Local Hero, it reprises themes from Mackendrick’s previous film, Whisky Galore, and may be his most personal cinematic moment.

Born to Scottish migrant workers in Boston, Massachusetts Mackendrick was sent to live in Glasgow after his father died of influenza. Raised by his grandparents, he never saw his mother again. Aspects of this traumatic upbringing are repeatedly woven into his films. Childhood, separation, and loss of innocence are recurrent themes.

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Affording Mackendrick the opportunity to explore his dual cultural heritage while critiquing the English, The Maggie is an emotionally complex film which satirises materialism, highlights the inflexibility of bureaucracy, and celebrates the plight of those who take a stand against a rigid authority.

A valentine to a way of life that was rapidly disappearing as the economy restructured in the years immediately after World War II, traditionalism is contrasted with then new forms of capitalism and an increased internationalisation. The crew of an obsolete ship are unwitting ambassadors for a sector of society that resisted transformation and cherished rituals.

Former school teacher Alex Mackenzie was 61 when he became an actor. In his first screen role he plays Captain MacTaggart, a wily veteran of the waves who desperately needs £300 to renew his shipping licence. An opportunity to raise the necessary funds arises when an official mistakenly agrees to allow a puffer boat to transport a wealthy American’s possessions to his holiday home.

After learning how his goods are being transported Calvin B. Marshall (Paul Douglas) sets out to reclaim the property. Failure to deliver the cargo will mean that the boat is decommissioned.

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More fulfilling than Whisky Galore, The Maggie has been unfairly overlooked for far too long. A deeply personal film from one of the Scottish film industry’s most significant figures. Expanding themes explored in his previous film, the director probes Scotland’s relationship with its transatlantic ally through the prism of his dual nationality. The naming of Paul Douglas’ character refers to Mackendrick’s Calvinist upbringing and the Marshall Plan.

Sentimental with a subversive undercurrent, The Maggie is one of Ealing Studio’s most rewarding comedies. Deserving of greater exposure, the superb restoration from the BFI and StudioCanal should see its reputation renewed.

The Maggie can be ordered from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Maggie-Ealing-Digitally-Restored-DVD/dp/B00U3PW56E/ref=tmm_dvd_title_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1439847232&sr=8-2

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Maggie-Ealing-Digitally-Restored-Blu-ray/dp/B00U3PW5T6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1439847232&sr=8-2&keywords=the+maggie

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8 thoughts on “Blu-ray Review: The Maggie”

  1. Oh, yes — a great movie, and thanks very much for the reminder!

    Somewhere in the house is, I think, an omnibus of all Munro’s Para Handy stories: about time I tried to find it for a reread, perhaps. Not for my American wife, however: she loyally tried it at some stage and discovered that (quite understandably) she could understand at best about one word in eight.

    Did you ever catch the Para Handy series that either the Beeb or ITV did in the ~1970s?

    1. Watched, and enjoyed, the BBC’s 1990s series. Just checked and surprisingly it’s not available on DVD. Shame because I enjoyed the series and would like to own a copy.

      1. Same here! How very odd that it’s not been released.

        Was the one I’m thinking of as late as the 1990s? I could have sworn it was earlier. I’ll go sus this out when I have time.

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