Blu-ray Review: Django, Prepare A Coffin

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In historical accounts of the Spaghetti Western the Django films are often overshadowed by Siegio Leone’s Man with No Name trilogy despite having at least eighty entries in the franchise, albeit of questionable legitimacy with the most recent being Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained. Whilst not a direct sequel, Tarantino’s film drew heavily from themes prevalent in the original films specifically a focus on wreaking revenge on an evil capitalist for the suffering Django’s wife has endured. With increased interest in the franchise since the release of the Tarantino film Arrow Films has given the 1968 sequel Django, Prepare A Coffin a HD restoration and Blu-ray release.

First appearing in the eponymously titled 1966 film, Django was originally portrayed as a Civil War veteran drifting across a newly reconstructed America . Dragging a sealed coffin across inhospitable terrains Django’s journey would not end until he had found the person responsible for this wife’s murder. Criticised at the time for its excessive violence the film was denied a certificate in Sweden and it wouldn’t be awarded one in the UK until 1993. Irrespective of whatever problems the film may have had in gaining a release in certain European territories it found an appreciative audience in Afro-Carribean countries, most notably Jamaica. In recent years the film, or rather its soundtrack gained a new audience when the it was sampled by Gnarls Berkley on the worldwide hit Crazy.

The precise number of sequels to the 1966 film is almost impossible to pin down with estimates varying from eighty to over a hundred but for the most part these are considered by aficionados to be unofficial. The criteria for deciding what constitutes a real ‘Django‘ film from the many imitators appears to be to be the participation of original lead actor Franco Nero the director Sergio Corbucci.

What differentiates Django, Prepare A Coffin from the numerous unofficial sequels is that a concerted effort was made to secure the services of Franco Nero and it was only when it became apparent that the production could not accommodate his commitments to an American project the decision was made to recast the role.

With a new Django on board played by Terrence Hill (They Call Me Trinity) the character’s backstory is substantially revised to the extent that this film could be called a reboot. Retiring from a life as a gun for hire in the services of an ambitious senator, Django heads off for pastures new with his wife. Whilst en route to California with a consignment of gold the trailer is attacked, his wife killed and Django left for dead.

Following the template laid down by the first film Django, Prepare a Coffin is a tale of revenge albeit somewhat less violent than the original. The subtitle plays on the audience’s foreknowledge of what is hidden inside Django’s coffin and the delaying of it’s reveal is part of an overall narrative strategy which is based upon misdirection and the implied promise of greater action to come.

Whilst not as well regarded as the 1966 film, Django, Prepare A Coffin is a classic example of the B-movie strand of Spaghetti Westerns. It most probably hasn’t looked as good at any time since the original release. In all previous domestic versions the image was softer, colours less defined. The restoration by Cinecteca di Bologna greatly enhances the range of visual information and this is particularly noticeable when viewing the exterior sequences. The overall package is complimented by some very well put together bonus content including an interview with Spaghetti Western expert Kevin Grant, optional English and Italian soundtracks, and a booklet by Howard Hughes.

Django, Prepare A Coffin can be ordered from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Django-Prepare-A-Coffin-Blu-ray/dp/B00CTRQL78/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371954911&sr=8-1&keywords=django+prepare+a+coffin

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