Jagarna (The Hunters)

The establishment of a consensus regarding Nordic Noir as a generic (or subgeneric) form and/or movement is something that is continuously debated both at the levels of content owners and within audience networks. Whilst the conceptual categories employed by individual audience members may, at times, differ somewhat from those utilised by commercial interests, the relatively scant knowledge concerning filmic and televisual texts has facilitated a situation in which both parties routinely trade information concerning fresh discoveries. For instance, Arrow Films’ dedicated Nordic Noir Facebook and Twitter accounts provide an online presence in which, in addition to promoting forthcoming releases, users may recommend titles for possible DVD release in the UK and Ireland whilst simultaneously providing critical commentary and maintaining community networks.

To classify Nordic Noir fandom as existing primarily in electronic form is at best a vast generalization and at worst deeply problematic. UCL’s Nordic Noir Book Club provides a physical environment for the discussion of literary texts and Arrow Films has recently announced the establishment of a film club which will screen content in advance of theatrical distribution and/or DVD release. Arrow Films venture will, when possible, incorporate question and answer sessions with creative personnel, this progressive approach emulates the convention experience enjoyed by other forms of media fandom and demonstrates that the distributor is actively seeking to engage with its core customer base. The establishment of a semi regular film club has the potential to enable fans to physically meet with other like minded individuals consequently strengthening relationships that may have previously only exited in terms of electronic communication.

Somewhat bravely, Arrow Films has elected to launch its film club by screening a sequel to a 1996 film. Jagarna 2 (False Trail) is a film directed by Kjell Sundvall and starring Rolf Lassgård (Wallander), the central premise is of the main protagonist returning to a rural community some years after the conclusion of the first film to investigate a particularly grisly murderer. I have been assured that Jagarna 2 is a relatively self contained text and a familiarity with the originating material is not a prerequisite for enjoying this latest instalment. Arrow Films marketing strategy for Jagarna 2 is directed at two distinct audiences; the causal purchaser and those whom are more inclined to seek out back catalogue items. The English language title, False Trail, evokes the investigative strand of the narrative and makes no reference whatsoever to the previous film but in e-mail correspondence to members of the film club Arrow Films cited the first film in this series possibly due to an already established familiarity with this filmic text by aficionados.

Released in the UK under the title The Hunters, Jagarna is a Swedish film about a police officer who returns to his childhood home to attend a funeral and soon becomes involved in investigating reindeer poaching. Jagarna is fundamentally a film in which dramatic tension is generated by the collision of oppositional forces/perspectives. After several years living and working in an urban environment (Stockholm) the protagonist has adopted a world view and working practices which run counter to those of the rural community. In his professional and domestic identities the protagonist is continuously reminded that urban sophistication has no place within Norrbotten.

Initially welcomed as a returning hero the protagonist is rapidly shunned by members of the community and faces increasing jeopardy as long term friends become enemies. The primary investigation seemingly relatively small scale becomes one that threatens to tear the entire community apart and expose the local police force as being institutionally corrupt.

Jagarna is a filmic text that is influenced by the Western genre. Through his dual roles as police officer and family member the protagonist is constantly seeking to tame the wilderness. In his absence the community has remained relatively unchanged and it is only through the death of his father that long standing tensions are openly expressed. Burdened by guilt due to years of exile and inaction the protagonist seeks to make amends by reinforcing law within the community and forging a stronger relationship with his brother. The all pervading stench of criminality and corruption is something the hero struggles not to be contaminated by. No matter how diligent he tries to be in his work ethic the professionalism is eroded in encounters with his brother thus setting up a moral dilemma which is present throughout the film.

For those who are going to see Jagarna 2 (False Trail) the original film is worth tracking down. A DVD with English subtitles is available from Amazon:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B009ZXOJAK/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_vjOOqb1QZ345D

Jagarna 2 (False Trail) will be released theatrically on 16 November:  http://www.falsetrailfilm.co.uk/index.html

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