Film Review: Nobel’s Last Will (Nobels testamante)

nobels_testamente

Since 2003 Swedish production company Yellow Bird has consistently constructed high end crime dramas for both the cinema screen and televisual transmission. To viewers from the UK the company is best known for the Millennium trilogy, Headhunters, Wallander (English language and Swedish versions). It’s most recent foray into filmic texts, Nobels testamente, represents an interesting transformation with regards the distribution of content which I will discuss in greater detail at various points throughout this blog entry.

Nobels testamante is an adaptation of a literary text by Liza Marklund. An English language version of the text, entitled Last Will, is to be published by Transworld Publishers on 27 September. The literary text is the sixth in a series of Nodic Noir novels featuring the journalist Annika Bengtzon. The rights to translate the Bengzton literary texts into feature films was previously held by Svensk Filmindustri and under the terms of the agreement they produced two movies directed by Colin Nutley and starring Anna Fredriksson; Sprängaren (2001), and Paradiset (2003).

As the current right holders ,Yellow Bird, and its co-producers, have embarked upon the ambitious project of simultaneously adapting six of the eight Annika Bengtzon novels and releasing them throughout 2012. Nobels testamente is the the first in this filmic franchise and it was released theatrically in Sweden on 2 March 2012. Additionally, the film has been released in several other territories including New Zealand and Australia but to date no UK screenings have been announced. Subsequent films in the franchise have been released direct to DVD and the viability of using a theatrical release to trail further instalments which are sold directly to the consumer is relatively untested, at least in the UK marketplace, consequently this development warrants further investigation.

Whilst Nobels testamante has been selected to launch the filmic franchise, the literary source material is the sixth in a series of eight texts and the extent to which this has necessitated substantial modifications to the protagonist’s character arc is something which requires consumption of all six filmic texts to determine and therefore, for now, I will focus solely on Nobels testamente analysing it’s effectiveness at persuading consumers to consider investing time and money in seeking out successive instalments.

The heroine, Annika Bengtzon (Malin Crépin), is a journalist who works for the Swedish newspaper Kvällspressen. Her primary assignment of covering the annual Nobel prize giving ceremony is modified somewhat after she witnesses the assassination of the recipient. The mutually exclusive roles of witness in a police investigation and lead journalist for a best selling tabloid create narrative tension as Annika is prohibited by a point of law from doing her job. The male imposed, and enforced, restriction of Annika’s professional practices initiates her attempts to subvert and ignore any obstacles establishes the character’s world view, personal arc, and frames similarities/differences with the primary antagonist.

Thematically, this is a film about the protagonist’s unwillingness to accept or be dominated by what she perceives as the inefficiency of male dominated society. In professional and private spheres she repeatedly demonstrates that the strictures which require her to conform to a particular mode of behaviour are inherently misguided. How she asserts her right to perform on her own terms propels the investigative aspect of the narrative and also leads to some simultaneously amusing and horrifying moments, particularly when she confronts a child who has been bullying her son and rather than adopt the more passive approach favoured by her partner she proceeds to inform the bully that she will kill him should he ever again terrorise her child.

That the literary texts which sired this filmic franchise are currently being issued to a UK audience might be part of a strategy to introduce the brand via print before issuing the films on DVD. On the basis of this first film I would not go out of my way to actively seek any of the sequels but were I familiar with the print version then perhaps my motivation would be to see all six films in order to ascertain how successfully they have been translated to the screen.

 

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